Retirement: Will You have Enough Money?

One of the things that I hear most often when having my first consultation meeting with a new client is their fear of running out of money. In fact, this is the number one concern, even more so since the Great Recession, per Gallup’s April 2016 Economy and Personal Finance survey.

Here is one example of the many conversations that I have had regarding potential threats to my client’s financial success. Recently, a retired couple shared the fact that they are facing an issue, which could derail their “Plan A” – dementia. Their concern is that potential escalating healthcare costs for the spouse who has received an early diagnosis may end up depleting the sizable nest egg they had painstakingly built over their working years, leaving the remaining spouse with very little. How quickly the funds are depleted depends on how fast the disease progresses, and how long the affected individual lives with the disease.

It’s very difficult to be completely prepared for this type of situation. However, there are options that may help to reduce the financial and emotional pain associated with the high cost of extended care for a family member suffering from a disabling disease.

The total cost of healthcare is rising, faster than inflation, and it does not appear that this trend will be reversed anytime soon. This is precisely why it’s so important to discuss healthcare-related situations, and why it is also critical that when helping new clients prepare a plan, we not only address their financial goals, but also their deepest concerns. One of the key aspects of my commitment as a financial advisor is to help provide clients peace of mind as part of the planning process.

Estate planning is not easy. It isn’t just about having a will and naming beneficiaries on your IRA and 401(k). There are other considerations. Unfortunately, we don’t know our future and it could be complex. Some pre-planning in this area can be helpful vs. waiting until the situation occurs, especially when it comes to helping make sure that you don’t deplete your entire nest egg.

Each person presents a different challenge, has a different set of goals and a different set of assets to help support those goals. They may have different health issues or different ideas when it comes to the transfer of wealth to the next generation or they may not even have another generation to pass their wealth on to. I always start off planning for the ideal situation, “Plan A” if you will. But life has many twists and turns, so it is critical that a plan anticipates some changes.

You may never be able to be totally prepared, mentally and financially, for every possible change that you might face over the (hopefully) many years of retirement, but it is valuable to have previously discussed how you might handle some of these scenarios.

One of the ways that we help our clients address these challenges is through educational workshops.

For example, last Fall, I invited estate planning attorney Albert Hehr from Meyers, Roman, Friedberg & Lewis to my 2016 Economic Update. During those sessions, Al reviewed all of the basic estate planning documents in detail, including why each one was needed and the ramifications for not having them. As part of that discussion, he specifically highlighted the dramatic financial impact that an extended illness can have on a couple’s financial status. He explained that while it can wipe out the financial assets of a single person, it can be extremely disastrous for a couple. It’s not uncommon for a healthy caregiving spouse, who did everything they could to care for their partner, to not only end up emotionally and physically exhausted, but to also end up financially ruined because they depleted their entire retirement savings.

Al and I have met with several of my clients regarding the importance of having proper and current estate planning documents in place well before a serious illness, divorce, or death of a loved one takes place. The true value of proper estate planning, is that it anticipates many situations, including those mentioned above, and outlines steps to take should one of them occur.

It is important not to put off sitting down with a financial advisor who can help create a plan that addresses your financial goals. As an expert, they can incorporate investment strategies that help ensure you and your family have enough money to support your long-term financial goals, thereby increasing your probability of success.

My mission as an advisor, is to help reduce or eliminate surprises and the concern with running out of money. If you need a plan, would like a second opinion or just have questions, don’t hesitate to contact me. I’m here to help.